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Comparative Evaluation of Cefmenoxime versus Cefoxitinin Serious Infections

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Erlanger Medical Center, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
    D.L. Bechard
    Correspondence
    Requests for reprints should be addressed to Dr. Douglas Bechard, Division of Infectious Diseases; University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Erlanger Medical Center, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37403.
    Footnotes
    1 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Erlanger Medical Center, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
    Affiliations
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Erlanger Medical Center, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
    S.H. Hawkins
    Footnotes
    1 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Erlanger Medical Center, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
    Affiliations
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Erlanger Medical Center, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
    S.C. Sutherland
    Footnotes
    1 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Erlanger Medical Center, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
    Affiliations
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Tennessee College of Medicine and Erlanger Medical Center, Chattanooga, Tennessee.
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      Fifty-nine patients with serious infections were assigned at random in a two-to-one ratio to receive either cefmenoxime or cefoxitin given intravenously in a dosage of 0.5 to 2.0 g every six hours. Of 44 patients evaluable for efficacy, eight had concomitant bacteremia and all but 10 had serious underlying disease. The average duration of therapy was seven days. All patients with skin and soft tissue infections were cured after treatment with either antibiotic. Cefmenoxime achieved clinical and bacteriologic cures in 92 and 83 percent, respectively, of 12 patients with pneumonia and in 100 and 82 percent of 11 patients with urinary tract infections. Cefoxitin therapy resulted in clinical and bacteriologic cures in all four patients with pneumonia. Among 10 patients with urinary tract infection, respective cure rates were 90 and 50 percent. Both antibiotics were well tolerated. One cefmenoxime-treated patient discontinued treatment because of a rash.
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