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Wooden toothpick and pancreatitis

  • Author Footnotes
    1 All authors had access to the data, revised and agreed with this version of the manuscript.
    Suely Meireles Rezende
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Suely Meireles Rezende. Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av Alfredo Balena, 190, 2nd floor, Room 255, 30130-100 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.
    Footnotes
    1 All authors had access to the data, revised and agreed with this version of the manuscript.
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 All authors had access to the data, revised and agreed with this version of the manuscript.
    Bruno Bom Furlan
    Footnotes
    1 All authors had access to the data, revised and agreed with this version of the manuscript.
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 All authors had access to the data, revised and agreed with this version of the manuscript.
    Túlio Cézar de Souza Bernardino
    Footnotes
    1 All authors had access to the data, revised and agreed with this version of the manuscript.
    Affiliations
    Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 All authors had access to the data, revised and agreed with this version of the manuscript.
Published:September 22, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2022.08.037
      A 43-year-old woman was consulted in the anticoagulant clinic with a complaint of abdominal pain, with irradiation to the back which. The pain started two weeks before and worsened during breathing. She was afebrile, anicteric, and denied nausea, vomiting or urinary complaints, but reported elimination of dark stools.
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