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Conjunctival Hemorrhages as a Sign of Infective Endocarditis

      A 77-year-old man was brought to our hospital by ambulance. His presenting complaints were worsening fatigue that had developed a week previously, followed by fever and a 2-day history of right wrist pain. He was unable to walk owing to extreme fatigue. He had been diagnosed with pharyngeal squamous carcinoma 2 years and 2 months previously and treated with chemotherapy and bioradiotherapy, which had resulted in complete remission. One year and 4 months previously, however, the carcinoma had recurred, and 1 year previously he had undergone a pharyngolaryngectomy and esophagectomy as salvage therapy for recurrent lesions with reconstruction using a free jejunal autograft, and a permanent tracheostomy was created.
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