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Excipient Hypersensitivity Masquerading as Multidrug Allergy

      Drug allergy to excipients remains underappreciated and frequently leads to inappropriate medication discontinuation.
      • Reker D
      • Blum SM
      • Steiger C
      • et al.
      “Inactive” ingredients in oral medications.
      Here, we report a patient with multidrug allergy, which was subsequently determined to be due to hypersensitivity to an excipient common to those medications’ specific formulations.
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      References

        • Reker D
        • Blum SM
        • Steiger C
        • et al.
        “Inactive” ingredients in oral medications.
        Sci Transl Med. 2019; 11: eaau6753https://doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aau6753
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