Advertisement

Subclavian Steal Syndrome, Cerebellar Infarctions, and Alcohol

Published:October 27, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2020.09.037
      A 74-year-old man with a history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and old myocardial infarction, presented with vertigo and vomiting that developed after dinner with vodka consumption (200 gr). He denied being a smoker. Nystagmus, associated with right cerebellar signs, ataxia and mild right hemiparesis, and pyramidal signs were found. Asymmetric radial pulses and blood pressure were noted on admission (140/80 right, 110/70 left). Otherwise, examination, laboratory tests, electrocardiogram, and echocardiography were unremarkable.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to The American Journal of Medicine
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Saha T
        • Naqvi SY
        • Ayah OA
        • et al.
        Subclavian artery disease: diagnosis and therapy.
        Am J Med. 2017; 130: 409-416
        • Labropoulos N
        • Nandivada P
        • Bekelis K
        Prevalence and impact of the subclavian steal syndrome.
        Ann Surg. 2010; 252: 166-170
        • Hennerici M
        • Klemm C
        • Rautenberg W
        The subclavian steal phenomenon: a common vascular disorder with rare neurologic deficits.
        Neurology. 1988; 38: 669-673
        • De Cocker LJL
        • Lovblad KO
        • Hendrikse J
        MRI of cerebellar infarction.
        Eur Neurol. 2017; 77: 137-146
        • Malpas SC
        • Robinson BJ
        • Maling TJB
        Mechanism of ethanol-induced vasodilation.
        J Appl Physiol. 1990; 68: 731-734