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The Simplest Explanation: Pancytopenia

  • Anubodh Varshney
    Affiliations
    Hospital Medicine Unit and the Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass

    Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass
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  • Ebrahim Barkoudah
    Correspondence
    Requests for reprints should be addressed to Ebrahim Barkoudah, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115.
    Affiliations
    Hospital Medicine Unit and the Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Mass

    Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass
    Search for articles by this author
      Pancytopenia has a very broad differential diagnosis. Fortunately, for a 76-year-old woman with abnormal blood counts, the cause was easily treated. The patient presented to the Emergency Department of our hospital after 10 days of fever, malaise, and anorexia. Daily fevers had been as high as 38.9°C (102°F). She also reported an unintentional 4.5-kg (10-lb) weight loss over the preceding month. She had no sore throat, cough, dyspnea, headache, neck stiffness, abdominal pain, nausea, emesis, diarrhea, dysuria, joint pains, or rashes.
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