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Update on Importance of Diet in Gout

      Abstract

      Gout is an inflammatory arthritis caused by deposition of monosodium urate crystals within synovial joints. Although it is most well-known for its arthritis, gout has an intimate relationship with many other cardiovascular and metabolic conditions. Current recommendations support aggressive medical therapy to treat gout, whereas dietary counseling has become less emphasized. This article argues for the absolute importance of dietary counseling in gout and proves why this counseling may impact the long term well-being of a patient with gout.

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      Linked Article

      • Dietary Management of Gout: What is the Evidence?
        The American Journal of MedicineVol. 130Issue 1
        • Preview
          We were interested to read the recent manuscript by Berl et al that “argues for the absolute importance of dietary counselling in gout and proves why this counselling may impact the long term well-being of a patient with gout.”1 In support of this argument, the authors cite many observational studies showing associations of dietary factors in development of incident gout in the general population, and intervention studies reporting modest reductions in serum urate concentrations in healthy patients without gout.
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