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Meaningful Utilization of After-visit Summaries in the Ambulatory Setting

      Frequently, patients are challenged to comprehend and recall medical information discussed during office visits. This is further complicated by patients' and physicians' tendency to overrate patients' understanding of medical information.
      • Lukoschek P.
      • Fazzari M.
      • Marantz P.
      • et al.
      Patient and physician factors predict patients' comprehension of health information.
      • Engel K.
      Patient comprehension of emergency department care and instructions: are patients aware of when they do not understand?.
      These gaps in comprehension may lead to decreased satisfaction with medical encounters, missed appointments, lack of adherence to recommended treatment plans,
      • Hibbard J.H.
      Engaging health care consumers to improve the quality of care.
      • Schillinger D.
      • Grumbach K.
      • Piette J.
      • et al.
      Association of health literacy with diabetes outcomes.
      • Kemp E.C.
      • Floyd M.R.
      • McCord-Duncan E.
      • Lang F.
      Patients prefer the method of “tell back-collaborative inquiry” to assess understanding of medical information.
      and increased malpractice claims.
      • Levinson W.
      • Roter D.L.
      • Mullooly J.P.
      • et al.
      Physician–patient communication. The relationship with malpractice claims among primary care physicians and surgeons.
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      References

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      1. HealthIT.gov. Step 5: Achieve meaningful use of clinical summaries - stage 2. Available at: http://www.healthit.gov/providers-professionals/achieve-meaningful-use/core-measures-2/clinical-summaries. Accessed October 9, 2014.

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        Improving the ambulatory patient experience within an academic department of medicine.
        Am J Med Qual. 2014 Dec 15; (pii: 1062860614562274. [Epub ahead of print])