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Commonly Used Data-collection Approaches in Clinical Research

  • Jane S. Saczynski
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester

    Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
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  • David D. McManus
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester

    Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
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  • Robert J. Goldberg
    Correspondence
    Requests for reprints should be addressed to Robert J. Goldberg, PhD, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655.
    Affiliations
    Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester
    Search for articles by this author
Published:September 17, 2013DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2013.04.016

      Abstract

      We provide an overview of the different data-collection approaches that are commonly used in carrying out clinical, public health, and translational research. We discuss several of the factors that researchers need to consider in using data collected in questionnaire surveys, from proxy informants, through the review of medical records, and in the collection of biologic samples. We hope that the points raised in this overview will lead to the collection of rich and high-quality data in observational studies and randomized controlled trials.

      Keywords

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