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Erratum

        Frisoli TM, Schmieder RE, Grodzicki T, Messerli FH. Salt and Hypertension: Is Salt Dietary Reduction Worth the Effort? Am J Med. 2012;125:433-439.
        On page 343, the last sentence on the left side of the page should read “In the Framingham Offspring cohort, heterozygote carriers of rare gene variants (Bartter and Gitelman syndromes), identified in 1.2% of the study cohort, had a systolic blood pressure 6 to 9 mmHg lower than that of noncarriers.”

        Linked Article

        • Salt and Hypertension: Is Salt Dietary Reduction Worth the Effort?
          The American Journal of MedicineVol. 125Issue 5
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            In numerous epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental studies, dietary sodium intake has been linked to blood pressure, and a reduction in dietary salt intake has been documented to lower blood pressure. In young subjects, salt intake has a programming effect in that blood pressure remains elevated even after a high salt intake has been reduced. Elderly subjects, African Americans, and obese patients are more sensitive to the blood pressure-lowering effects of a decreased salt intake. Depending on the baseline blood pressure and degree of salt intake reduction, systolic blood pressure can be lowered by 4 to 8 mm Hg.
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