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Mentoring in medicine: keys to satisfaction

      A mentor may be defined as an active partner in an ongoing relationship who helps a mentee maximize potential and reach personal and professional goals. Research in law, business, and nursing has shown that mentoring leads to higher levels of career satisfaction and a higher rate of promotion, with a greater effect if it begins early in a person’s career (
      • Schapira M.M.
      • Kalet A.
      • Schwartz M.D.
      • et al.
      Mentorship in general internal medicine.
      ,
      • Roche G.R.
      Much ado about mentors.
      ). In nonmedical fields, however, mentoring seems to occur less frequently with women and members of minority groups, although it may have a greater influence on them (
      • Redmond S.P.
      Mentoring and cultural diversity in academic settings.
      ,
      • Sirridge M.S.
      The mentor system in medicine—how it works for women.
      ).
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