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Long-term oral ciprofloxacin: Experience in the treatment of incurable infective endocarditis

  • George L. Daikos
    Affiliations
    Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Autopsy Service, Department of Pathology, University of Illinois, College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Shashi B. Kathpalia
    Affiliations
    Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Autopsy Service, Department of Pathology, University of Illinois, College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Valentina T. Lolans
    Affiliations
    Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Autopsy Service, Department of Pathology, University of Illinois, College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • George Gee Jackson
    Correspondence
    Requests for reprints should be addressed to Dr. George Gee Jackson, Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, P.O. Box 6998, Chicago, Illinois 60680.
    Affiliations
    Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Autopsy Service, Department of Pathology, University of Illinois, College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Egil Fosslien
    Affiliations
    Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine and Autopsy Service, Department of Pathology, University of Illinois, College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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      Abstract

      Acute septic infective endocarditis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in two patients with conditions that made it incurable, was treated with long-term orally administered ciprofloxacin. Bacteremia and symptoms cleared, resulting in subjective well-being without cure for three and one half and 22 months, respectively. Large amounts of ciprofloxacin, 150 and 1,440 g, respectively, were given continuously without apparent adverse reactions. Blood isolates of P. aeruginosa after treatment had limited progression of resistance to ciprofloxacin. Use of orally administered ciprofloxacin provides new opportunities for the long-term treatment of serious infections with restricted risk of bacterial drug resistance and no appreciable side effects.
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